Family Friday: Summer Water Fights!

Set up a time for a special water fight with your kids.  Use hoses, buckets, and water balloons!  Challenge your kids to take you on.  Bring the neighborhood kids in as well.  The joy you have will overflow to your kids hearts (Zechariah 10:7).

From John Bennett, Preschool and Children’s Ministries Director for the Kentucky Baptist Convention, “Some Fun Family Devotional Ideas,” KBC Growing Ministries Tour.  To submit a Family Friday idea, write to kids@sojournchurch.com

Art Camp @ Sojourn East

SojournKids is excited to announce an art workshops with outdoor games at our East campus. On Thursday-Friday, July 22nd and 23rd from 9:00 AM until 12:00 Noon and on Saturday, July 24th beginning at 11:00 AM for a gallery opening/celebration.  This is a great opportunity to invite friends and neighbors to learn about our Creator, learn about worshiping Him through our creativity, and enjoy some time outside in his creation! Please join us by pre-registering or signing up to serve.

The Art of Storytelling, Part 3

Stories Of Change from Sojourn Community Church on Vimeo.

The art of storytelling gives children a basic framework for understanding truth as well as the courage to live and tell about it. This week, I’m posting six important things to know about great stories!  Here is #5 and #6:

5. Stories inspire hope by giving us a “peek” at the end. Despair is not just a sin theologically—because it assumes that the grand story is about us.  It’s also a mistake because it assumes we know the end of the story.  Michelle Anthony has recently written, “We often don’t tell our kids about the end of the story… Maybe we think it’s too bloody or too intense, or maybe we don’t understand it all, but in reality it makes Jesus the kind of hero worth living and dying for.  Knowing that Christ is the ultimate victor gives each one of us [kids included] the courage to walk with Him on the journey.”  For kids, knowledge of darkness is sometimes intuitive, but they need to be told that darkness can be defeated.  Perhaps, G.K. Chesterton said it best:  “Fairy tales do not tell children that dragons exist.  Children already know that dragons exist.  Fairy tales tell children that dragons can be killed.”  When we are reading Revelation and we see the king and the white horse and the dragon thrown into the pit, we can step lighter and smile wider.   Peeking at the end makes us optimistic.  As the old hymn says, “Though the wrong seems oft so strong, God is the ruler yet.” Continue Reading…

The Art of Storytelling, Part 2

The art of storytelling gives children a basic framework for understanding truth as well as the courage to live and tell about it. This week, I’m posting six important things to know about great stories!  Here are important things #3 and #4:

3. You cannot have a good story without conflict. When you begin to write you realize this.  Writing great stories involves chasing your main characters up a tree and throwing stones at them (I think Donald Miller said that).  On a more personal level, you begin to understand your own story better when recognize this profound truth.   You begin to understand and find comfort in the midst of your own suffering, because you discover a way to reconcile where we find ourselves in this world with what the Author of our stories tells us about himself.  He tells us that he’s good.  He tells us he is at work in all things to bring about good for us, and he tells us we should trust him.  Seeing how a story works gives us the ability to see above the fray and imagine what God could be up to.  Stories remind us that our lives and our suffering too are going somewhere. Continue Reading…

The Art of Storytelling, Part 1

The art of storytelling gives children a basic framework for understanding truth as well as the courage to live and tell about it. Over the next few days, I’ll post six important things to know about great stories!  Here is #1 and #2.

1. All great stories have a “joyous turn,” the point at which you think the “bad guys” are going to win the day and good is going to be vanquished forever, and suddenly, everything changes! The incarnation of Christ is the “joyous turn” in the human story, and the “joyous turn” of the incarnation story is the resurrection.  It is the decisive moment at which everything changes – death is defeated, God’s new creation is ushered in, and from this point forward, the enemy’s end is certain. All good, engaging stories work like this!  There’s always a conflict, victory seems all but lost, and often when you least expect it, there’s a joyous turn.  Well, Stephen King doesn’t work that way, but twisted horror stories are so excellent because they play on our expectation that the story should have a joyous turn. Continue Reading…